Collections: Thoughts and Things Celebrate, Create, Contemplate. Repeat.

Money Makes The World Go ‘Round

This is just a temporary collection. An array of vivid, pretty colors and patterns.

For origami? Not quite.

Fistful of Australian Dollars

It’s not paper. It’s a plastic/polymer.  Easily recyclable, but I don’t think you’d want to because–

A Rainbow of Currency

–it’s Australian currency!  Filled front to back with fabulous details. Just slight variation in sizes. I had never seen an Australian dollar until this week. Curious like a cat wombat, off I clicked to the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs & Trade to learn more.

And I must give a shout out to a very engaging, interactive website. Way to go Aussies. Each banknote has a story. Please check it out too. Designs, history and even games. banknotes.rba.gov.au/

The mini scoop:

Australian banknotes changed in 1966 as the currency switched from the pound to the decimal/dollar system.  A polymer technology for banknotes was designed in Australia and introduced in 1988. Between 1992-96, a new series of bills were introduced.  The denominations are $5, $10, $20, $50 and $100. Unique as it is the first currency in the (modern) world not printed on paper.

50 AUD

As the mother of 4 daughters here in the 21st century, it is amazing that this next fact was a surprise. Each of the five bills feature a woman on one side. Admittedly Queen Elizabeth II is a slam-dunk to appear. But woo hoo. The $50 note features David Unaipon, an Aboriginal author and inventor.

Go Mary! Australian $20

Must admit that Mary Reibey on the $20 above surprised me, with a resemblance to Benjamin Franklin.  She was almost a contemporary, her life spanned 1777–1855. She arrived in New South Wales as a convict at age 13, and went on to become successful in the shipping business and philanthropy. (Horse stealing, disguised as a boy, seven children, now on the $20. Go Mary. Yes, there are books about her.)

I picture many exotic animals in the Land Down Under but seeing this peeking out was a surprise.

Detail, Camel riding missionaries

A camel? This image is of a Flynn Boundary rider also known as a Patrol Padre, one of the camel riding missionaries from the early 1900’s. That’s just plain fun.

Now what else? Brumbies detail

Brumbies. Do you recall the poem The Man From Snowy River? A brumby is a wild Australian horse. Honored on the $1o bill.

I love the layers, symbolism and meanings of images used in the US currency. But must admit this outback rainbow is very entertaining. The variety of items embedded in each note are impressive.

To those easily distracted by squirrels or sparkly things (like myself), the windows on each bill may be of interest. I saw them, or should I say saw through them, and thought how cute!

They are one of seven security measures.  Still cute though.

A pocketful of history like these bills completely fascinate me.  (As you may recall from previous posts,  www.collectionsthoughtsandthings.com/old-money/ & www.collectionsthoughtsandthings.com/gone-fishing/   Think I may just go read up on the Hungarian Forint.

More Australian banknote scoop at: www.dfat.gov.au/facts/currency.html

. . . banknotes also offer an opportunity to honour Australians who have made an important contribution to the nation. The notable Australians that presently feature on our banknotes were selected in consultation with various respected members of the community, including designers, art curators, historians and psychologists. The Reserve Bank of Australia

PS.

I do not randomly order foreign currency (yet), or travel frequently (yet). So how did I come upon a fistful of fancy dollars?  Our sweet baby is heading off to Australia! And she just exchanged some of the spending money she has earned. She has studied very hard, and applied to an amazing study abroad program. Crazy as it sounds, there is actually a camel trek located within an hour or so from campus. So proud of our little banana. Sniff.  Now please finish packing.)

 

 

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